For the most Extra of Extroverts – How to make the most of isolation

Recently, things went from “hey, maybe we should be aware of our hygiene habits” to “stay home and don’t socialize” VERY quickly. As I scroll through my social media I see a large amount of fear, anger, frustration, boredom, and anxiety. We all want want to wrap up our most vulnerable people in a safe bubble and spray the idiots out partying in the eyes with lysol. I, however, am in a strange place of comfort and positivity and encouragement, not just because I am a perpetually happy person but because this time last year, I was doing this EXACT same thing.

Me. Having a great time on bed rest. We clocked 49 days. Go Us!

Okay, not exactly… But for anyone feeling like they’re going to explode from boredom and lack of human contact and loss of freedom. I FEEL YOU. Last year, this month, I was on antepartum bed rest unable to leave the hospital. Medically mandated social distancing. I was terrified and anxious and under stimulated and spending a LOT of time on social media. So because I have been there in the trenches of the yellow wallpaper, I want to give y’all my top five tips for how to get through this whole “don’t leave your house” situation without having a breakdown.

First – Stick to a routine. Start it by getting up and getting ready every day. We will all likely be on shelter in place for at least a month. 30 days is how long it takes to create a habit. What productive and positive habits do you want to have in 30 days? Do you want permanent sweatpants and clogged pores? Take care of yourself and facilitate good habits. Plus the feeling of a good shower and being your best self is SO rewarding.

Second – Go outside and be a part of the world around you. The sun alone has a healing effect. Even if you just picnic a cup of coffee and your breakfast on your front stoop, give yourself some fresh air and take in your surroundings. During antepartum, when I was first admitted to the hospital, I was allowed to go on walks with my husband in a wheelchair to go outside. We would go to the hospital cafeteria and get ice cream and watch the boats in the harbor. It was my favorite part of my day. You know what one of my worst days was? The day they told me I couldn’t leave my room anymore. The world’s greatest authors all write about the majesty of nature because we’re meant to be in it. Go outside and be present in it.

Third – Do something that makes you happy. Many people are working and/or trying to teach from home. We want the reward of producing results and checkboxes of productivity. However, when you can’t leave your space and you’re feeling a loss of control, it is so much more important to feed your soul with joy. For me, its creative projects, usually with my Cricut these days. In the hospital I did macrame, colored, and did crafts with my older son when my family came to visit. So pick something joyous and DO IT. Game night, creative projects, back yard olympics, garage cross fit, just be joyful in your activity.

Fourth – Surround yourself with positive content. I thought that my antepartum stay was a great time to binge catch up on four seasons of Game of Thrones. It was a terrible decision. When you watch a show or movie you, as a normal human, internalize the feelings and lives of the characters. When there is already a heavy amount of emotion going on during your normal day to day, you can’t handle the extra drama, it will absolutely make you more depressed and anxious. This includes the news. I suggest stand-up specials (Trevor Noah was my favorite on bed rest), comedy shows and movies, and of course only the funniest of memes. Give me all of the literary references! I live for them. Your emotions need the same balance the rest of your life does, so give them positivity to balance the heavy weight of the current world.

This is actually a terrible example because I was watching “Fried Green Tomatoes”

Fifth – Use social media for socializing in positive ways. Don’t spend all of your down time mindlessly scrolling. Choose people you want to reach out to. Schedule virtual happy hours with friends, do the Instagram challenges with colleagues (especially the funny ones), play games like Words with Friends or Draw Something. Make sure your social media interactions are meaningful and create feelings of real connection. It is so easy as an outgoing, extroverted person to click on and respond to everything we see online (I still struggle with this). If you choose to focus on only creating true connection with followers, you’ll find that it feels less like mindless media screen time and more like real friendship.

Those are the five. I could have rambled for a sixth paragraph about food, but because everyone has their own complicated relationship with food, I will leave you to navigate your stash of Pirate’s Booty, leftover Valentine’s candy, and alcohol on your own terms. I just hope whatever you have is better than the ‘avocado toast’ I enjoyed in the hospital.

Smile. Choose Kindness. Wash Your Hands. Stay Home.

This too shall pass.